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Exploring the views thoughts and mannerisms of sexual behavior in the late 19th century England, Known as the Victorian Era. The Victorian period in England spans from 1837 to 1901 under the reign of Queen Victoria. With Victorians generally considered narrow minded, prudish and stuffy. Sexuality was being overtly suppressed in this era, and how it affected the values and conventions of the time in English society, and how this gave rise to the underground sexual element in print, and practice, as well as the psychology of sex, and how doctor’s , and citizens coped with the libido of the time.

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The Victorian era is known as the reign of Queen Victoria, which started on June 20th 1837 and ended on January 22nd 1901 with her death. This was considered by the English to have been a very lengthy period of very high refined sensibilities along with prosperity and peace for Great Britain. In fact Victorian England was thought to be an era of confidence for the British Empire.

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There was also a great cultural shift from the previous era of rationalism which was known as the Gregorian era, and moved as far as the arts, social values and spirituality embraced “Romanticism and Mysticism”. However in the Victorian period there was this all-pervading morale climate known as the “Victorian Morality”, a stringent set of morale-social behavior and sexual restraint, which was viewed hypocritical by many back then and today; citing the proliferating morale dignity and refined restraint along -side such social phenomena such as child labor and prostitution.

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Victorian men and women who were married had to undress behind screens, for doing so in front of  their spouses was considered taboo, but at the beach, everybody went fully nude which was the norm.

 

There were over 9,000 prostitutes in London, so society turned a blind eye, as women were 2nd class citizens , that is unless you were part of the nobility, but women were still not allowed to vote.  Women working at a house of “ill repute” were looked upon as “fallen ladies”, but the husbands of respectable wives was still employing them  as married woman were encouraged not to have sex with their husbands except for procreation, and there was nothing a wife could do, as “Victorian law didn’t allow women to get divorced for adultery, unless cruelty could be proven in court.

 

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